Meet the Saint: Springfield Armory’s AR-15 [Video]

Meet the Saint: Springfield Armory’s AR-15

Introducing Springfield Armory’s SAINT: an AR-15 in 5.56, featuring a great trigger, a 16″ barrel with 1:8 twist, direct impingement mid-length gas system, dual aperture rear sight and a 30-rd Gen M3 Magpul PMAG. Find out more about the Springfield Armory Saint at http://www.springfield-armory.com/products/saint/, and https://www.defendyourlegacy.com.

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Archers have run-in with charging bruin

Archers have run-in with charging bruin

BILLINGS – There was no time for Russel Ferster to think, only to react – a series of snap judgments and muscle memory that in the end measured his life in a fraction of an inch. The 24-year-old Absarokee native was archery hunting for elk with his 11-year-old brother, Lane, on Sept.

BILLINGS – There was no time for Russel Ferster to think, only to react — a series of snap judgments and muscle memory that in the end measured his life in a fraction of an inch.

The 24-year-old Absarokee native was archery hunting for elk with his 11-year-old brother, Lane, on Sept. 11 on the north side of the Crazy Mountains.

“We weren’t even 15 minutes out of the pickup and I decided to cow call twice,” Russel said.

It was one of the first archery outings for Lane. Russel, a 12-year veteran of the sport, was hoping to get his brother close to his first bull elk. But instead of an elk responding to the plaintive mewing sounds that Russel made to mimic a lovelorn cow elk, a black bear came busting out of the brush in an explosion of black fur.

Perceptions

When he first heard the brush moving, Russel thought he’d lucked into a bull and moved Lane off to the side so he could prepare to shoot; then the bear appeared.

“He was coming real fast with his head down and didn’t see us,” Russel said. “I’ve had bears come in to cow calls before. Usually when they see us they turn around.”

So Russel raised his hands over his head and shouted at the bear. It stopped about 15 feet away and then started to pounce up and down on its front paws and barred its teeth, as if agitated by the hunters’ deception.

It wasn’t until that moment that Russel realized he hadn’t brought along any bear spray or a handgun, which his father, Richard, always encourages him to carry.

“I grew up hunting in grizzly country,” Russel said. “It turns out it’s good to have them for black bears, too.

“It was a terrible mistake that I won’t make again.”

Bear weary

In fact, Russel said he quit hunting the Paradise Valley area because of all the grizzly bear activity. When the hunters would take horses into the backcountry of southwestern Montana, they would sometimes spend more time rounding up horses scared off by bears than they would searching for game.

“It’s not much fun,” he said. “You’re constantly worried.”

That worry couldn’t match the fear Russel felt when the black bear charged, though. Without the choice of a pistol or spray to use on the bear, he quickly loaded an arrow onto his bow and told Lane to get behind him. When Lane moved the bear surged ahead.

“He came at 100 miles an hour,” Russel said. “I had a split second to aim and hit him in the only place that would stop him in his tracks.”

Pulling back his BowTech BT-X compound bow, which can fire his Easton Axis Full Metal Jacket arrows tipped with a 100 grain Slick Trick broadhead at 350 feet per second, Russel fired.

“I hit him in the only place that would stop him in his tracks, just above the eye, and the broadhead managed to penetrate into the brain,” he said.

The bear crumpled so close to Russel’s feet that the opposite end of the arrow hit him in the leg.

“Even that close, it barely penetrated the bear’s skull,” he said.

Frozen

When Russel took the bear to Don Keever at Anglers and Antlers Taxidermy in Billings, Keever had to believe the “crazy” tale. After all, the proof was right there — a bear skull with a broadhead stuck in it.

“I’ve heard a lot of crazy stories in this business,” Keever said. “I told him, ‘I don’t know if you’re a Christian or not, but God was looking out for you.’ ”

“The guy at Anglers and Antlers told me I’m lucky,” Russel said. “He said if that broadhead penetrated 1/16th of an inch less, it would not have put him down. That’s one of the thickest bones on their body.”

Collapse

The bear encounter pumped so much adrenaline into Russel’s body that he had to lie down on the ground to collect himself after firing the fatal shot.

“Lane couldn’t talk about it for about a half hour,” he said.

After tagging and gutting the bear, Russel tied its front paws together so he could carry it on his back to the truck, the bear’s feet dragging on the ground. He estimated its live weight at more than 200 pounds.

“That was an odd feeling,” Russel said, having the bruin’s dead head resting on his shoulder.

Upon arriving at his parents’ home, the brothers recounted the story.

“I was just glad that they were OK,” the boys’ father, Richard, said. “We’ve run into bears a lot, but they don’t react like that.

“It was quite the adventure.”

“My mom is terrified of bears so it scared her to death,” Russel said.

Edgy

Since then, Russel and Lane have been out hunting again, and both were a little nervous the first time they stepped back into the woods.

“I’ve hunted bears before,” Russel said. “I’ve taken one prior to that in the spring rifle season. This was my first archery bear — but we definitely weren’t bear hunting. We had no choice.”

Neither one of the brothers filled their elk tag during the archery season, but are planning more trips during the rifle season.

Even now, more than a month later, Russel said the entire incident keeps popping into his head like instant replay.

“It’s definitely kept me up at night,” wondering what else he could have done.

“Who’s to say it wasn’t a bluff charge? I’ve been in lots of situations with grizzlies where I’ve gotten bluff charged. But it was no bluff charge unless he was going to stop on top of us.”

If that had occurred, what then?

“The only backup plan I had was to use my knife until Lane got to the truck.”

Since the bear encounter, Russel said he has never forgotten to bring along bear spray and a handgun. For now, the black bear resides in Keever’s freezer where it will one day be tanned for display, a constant reminder of a harrowing encounter. The skull will be cleaned for display, a broadhead firmly stuck in its brow, just above the left eye.

“It was scary,” Russel said, “but it’s a pretty cool deal now that it’s over.”

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Hunter numbers strong, harvest slows in south central Montana

The number of hunters who stopped at Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks’ south central Montana check stations over the weekend generally were higher than the same weekend last year. But fewer hunters took home game, thanks in part to comfortable weather.

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The number of hunters who stopped at Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks’ south central Montana check stations over the weekend generally were higher than the same weekend last year. But fewer hunters took home game, thanks in part to comfortable weather.

Bystander, store owner stops suspects after pursuit through Billings

A good guy with a gun stops the bad guys. Good job sir.

Bystander, store owner stops suspects after pursuit through Billings

Montana Highway Patrol confirmed one suspect is on the loose Saturday night, but does not pose a threat to the public. Trooper Dell Aman said attempted to pull over the Ford Explorer with temporary registration that didn’t appear proper around North 13th Street. Aman said the driver fled west on 2nd Avenue North.

BILLINGS –

Montana Highway Patrol confirmed one suspect is on the loose Saturday night, but does not pose a threat to the public.

Trooper Dell Aman said attempted to pull over the Ford Explorer with temporary registration that didn’t appear proper around North 13th Street.

Aman said the driver fled west on 2nd Avenue North.

From when the trooper attempted the stop to the crash was roughly two minutes, Aman said.

The two apprehended suspects, 27 and 37 in age, were transported to the hospital with non-life threatening injuries.

The 37-year-old man had a felony warrant out for his arrest.

Both of the men arrested are from Billings.

The investigation is ongoing.

At least two suspects are in custody after leading Montana Highway Patrol on a pursuit that ended in downtown Billings on Saturday.

A Ford Explorer slammed into the driver side of a GMC Sierra pickup around 5:30 p.m. at the intersection of 1st Avenue North and North 22nd Street.

Following the crash, the three men inside the flipped Explorer fled the scene.

A Billings man, Jake Vangen, who was at Northside Pawn when the crash occurred, said the Explorer was headed west on 1st Avenue, then doubled back by turning left on North 21st Street, east on Montana Avenue, then north on North 22nd Street.

The Explorer did not stop, running the intersection and colliding into the GMC, which caused it to spin and strike a parked car.

“He didn’t hit his brakes or anything, sped through the intersection and hit the truck,” Vangen said.

The occupants of the GMC did not appeared injured.

Meanwhile, Vangen saw two of the men attempt to flee.

“They started running away until I pulled my firearm on them and put them on the ground,” he said.

With his pistol trained on one of the suspect, who then complied. “The firearm made them pretty submissive,” Vangen said. “As far as I know, they were armed and dangerous criminals. They posed a threat to me, my son, anyone in this area by acting the way they were. So if you can stop that, that’s what you need to do.”

Vangen said he focused on safety of him and the suspect, make sure he saw where their hands were at all times.

The owner of Northside Pawn and another bystander was able to stop the second suspect from fleeing in an alley.

“Is he pulling a gun, is he pulling a knife out, is he trying to do something here that could hurt me, I didn’t want any of that to happen,” Vangen said. “So my main focus was keeping his hands visible while my gun was pointed at his forehead.”

“Don’t shoot me,” one of the suspects pleaded with Vangen.

Social media praised Vangen as a hero for his actions. He said he was glad no one got hurt.

“I’m just glad [the driver’s of the GMC] is okay and the people who did that to him are hopefully all locked up,” Vangen said.

As of this posting, police were still searching for a possible third suspect.

We reached out to Montana Highway Patrol for more information as to why the driver led troopers on a pursuit and the name of the two suspects arrested.

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1127 Montana Gun Traders & Counting . .

Montana Gun Trader is growing fast. Share this post with six or more of your family members and/or friends now.

Montana Gun Trader

Join now to buy, sell & trade new & used firearms, ammunition, gun parts & accessories with over 1000 Montanans . Montana Gun Trader was established in February of 2016 as a result of Facebook blocking gun sales groups as we all knew they eventually would.

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Dear Montana Democrat Gun Owners [Video]

Growing up in a Montana family sometimes politically divided, back in what some of us call the Kennedy democrat days, it is possible to imagine some level of loyalty there may still be in the party among Montana democrat gun owners, who think maybe the national party will come back to their senses.

Hillary Clinton is the farthest thing from a Kennedy democrat I can personally imagine. She does not appear to have a noble bone in her body. This woman will say anything to get elected. She lies and is insulated from accountability like nothing we’ve ever seen. We may not agree with Trump all the time and he says some off the cuff things just like all of us. But he wears his heart on his sleeve and tells it like it is.

Public Hillary vs. Private Hillary

Hillary Clinton can’t be trusted. Publicly, she may say she “respects” the Second Amendment, but privately it’s a different story.

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Arby’s to sell venison sandwiches?

Don’t get too excited. They’re not doing it here yet. Is this a good idea in Montana?

Oh deer: Arby’s to sell venison sandwiches

ATLANTA – Deer hunting season is on the way, but fans of venison might not have to trek out into the woods this year to get their fix. Arby’s has announced that it will be offering venison sandwiches this fall in six states where deer hunting is popular.

ATLANTA – Deer hunting season is on the way, but fans of venison might not have to trek out into the woods this year to get their fix.

Arby’s has announced that it will be offering venison sandwiches this fall in six states where deer hunting is popular. The Atlanta-based chain says its sandwich will include thick-cut venison steak and crispy onions on a roll.

In a release announcing the sandwich, Arby’s chief marketing officer Rob Lynch acknowledges that the new menu item is unusual, he adds that the deer meat meal is “incredibly delicious.”

“We’re a brand that’s not afraid to take risks, and while the venison sandwich is probably the biggest stretch for us yet, it’s incredibly delicious and we can’t wait to get it in the hands of our guests,” he said in a statement. “You won’t leave a hunt empty-handed after stopping by Arby’s.”

The venison sandwich will be available for a few days at select restaurants from Oct. 31 to Nov. 28 in Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and Georgia.

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What Conservatives Get Right About Guns

Liberal news rags are starting to come around? They must have something up their sleeve……

4 Things Conservatives Get Right About Guns

Gun policy expert Lois Beckett of the Guardian US explains the four things you need to know about firearms in America. I grew up in Connecticut, firmly on one side of the gun culture war. My parents thought it was wrong even to let kids play with toy guns.

Gun policy expert Lois Beckett of the Guardian US explains the four things you need to know about firearms in America.

I grew up in Connecticut, firmly on one side of the gun culture war. My parents thought it was wrong even to let kids play with toy guns. But I made a vow to myself when I started covering this debate: I would not be one one of those New York City journalists who writes ignorant, condescending stories about “gun nuts.”

As it expanded into the United States, the liberal British newspaper The Guardian did something most media outlets haven’t done: it assigned a reporter to cover gun politics full-time, not just in the wake of the latest mass shooting. My job as The Guardian US’s gun reporter is to explore the big questions: Why do we struggle so much to fix America’s gun violence problem? What would it take to save more lives?

When I actually dug into the data, I was shocked by how little evidence there was behind some of the most prominent gun control policies. Here are some basic facts that gun rights advocates already know—and that liberals who want to reduce gun violence need to understand.

1. Banning assault weapons would do almost nothing
After every high-profile shooting, Democrats like Hillary Clinton call for a ban on “assault weapons,” the military-style rifles that have been dubbed the weapon of choice for mass shooters.

There’s a problem with this popular liberal idea: banning these guns would not do much to save American lives. Only 3.6 percent of America’s gun murders are committed with any kind of rifle, according to FBI data. The majority of gun murders are committed with handguns. Even the Democratic staffers who wrote the now-expired 1994 federal assault weapon ban knew it was a largely symbolic policy.

There’s some evidence that banning high-capacity ammunition magazines might—over the very long term—reduce gun injuries. But a ban on the guns themselves “does nothing,” a former Obama administration official said last year. Though the White House endorsed a renewed ban after Sandy Hook, “we did the bare minimum,” the official said. “We would have pushed a lot harder if we had believed in it.”

The real effect of Democrats’ decades-long war on “assault weapons,” some advocates speculate, is that it’s simply made military-style guns more popular.

2. Owning 17 guns really isn’t that extreme
Just 3% of American adults own half the country’s guns, a new Harvard/Northeastern study estimated—and they own an average of 17 guns each.

To a non-gun owner, this might sound like a lot. But you have to think of guns as tools: a few different rifles for hunting different kinds of game, plus a shotgun, a handgun or two for self-protection, and some antique guns inherited from your grandfather. It adds up fast.

As one gun rights activist put it, “Why do you need more than one pair of shoes? The truth is, you don’t, but do you want more than one pair of shoes? If you’re going hiking, you don’t want to use that one pair of high heels.”

3. Only a tiny fraction of America’s guns are used in crimes
American civilians own between 265 million and 400 million guns. That’s at least one gun for every American adult. (There’s no official national count. Gun rights advocates are fiercely private about gun ownership and fear that if the government can track guns, it will be able to confiscate them.) Gun control advocates often note that America’s gun murder rate is 25 times higher than other high-income countries, and that this drives an overall murder rate than is 7 times higher than other rich countries.
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Inside the Federal Bureau Of Way Too Many Guns

But the vast majority of America’s gun owners—and their guns—aren’t involved in this violence. About 100,000 Americans are killed or violently injured with guns each year—a number that includes gun suicides. The total number of crimes involving guns is higher: as many as 500,000 a year, according to Justice Department estimates.

Roughly speaking, that means that fewer than 1% of American guns are used in recorded crime or violence each year. Most of America’s hundreds of millions of guns are sitting in gun safes, being used for target practice or hunting, and causing no harm at all.

4. Gun crime dropped even as Americans bought more firearms
After the school shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in 2012, pollsters asked if Americans thought gun crime was increasing or decreasing. 56% said gun crime had gone up over the past two decades. Only 12% knew the truth: gun murders had dropped by nearly 50% since the early 1990s. Over the same time period, Americans bought an estimated 70 million more guns.

This trend isn’t proof that more guns equal less crime—many factors drove a spike in gun violence in the early 1990s, and a drop afterwards. But it does show that the relationship between America’s high gun ownership rates and its high gun murder rates is more complex than a simple correlation.

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Antlerless Whitetail Deer Harvest Opportunity on General A-tag ends at the end of Shooting Hours Today (Friday) in Northwest Montana

Hunters are reminded that the ability to harvest an antlerless white-tail deer on a general A-tag ends after this Friday. Starting Saturday, October 29th, only antlered white-tailed deer may be harvested on a general license in most hunting districts….

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Hunters are reminded that the ability to harvest an antlerless white-tail deer on a general A-tag ends after this Friday. Starting Saturday, October 29th, only antlered white-tailed deer may be harvested on a general license in most hunting districts. Youth hunters 15 years of age and younger, and people with disabilities permitted to hunt from a vehicle, can take antlerless white-tailed deer through the end of the season. Mule deer are buck-only in all hunting districts.

Gallup: In U.S., Support for Assault Weapons Ban at Record Low

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The fewest Americans in 20 years favor making it illegal to manufacture, sell or possess semi-automatic guns known as assault rifles. Thirty-six percent now want an assault weapons ban, down from 44% in 2012 and 57% when Gallup first asked the question in 1996.

In U.S., Support for Assault Weapons Ban at Record Low

Story Highlights 36% favor a ban on assault rifles, down from 44% four years ago Half of Democrats and a quarter of Republicans favor this ban A majority of those in households without guns oppose such a ban WASHINGTON, D.C.

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